Death of Democracy II

Part 2

Last week we offered a link to Lee Drutman’s article “We need political parties. But their rabid partisanship could destroy American democracy” on Vox, September 5th, 2017.  This week, in Death of Democracy – Part 2 (an admittedly transitional post for the sake of relative brevity of Part 3) we consider some of the antecedents to the democracy we see melting all around us.

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Death of Democracy

Part 1

Before the [civil] war, it was said ‘the United States are’, grammatically it was spoken that way and was thought of as a collection of independent states. And after the war it was always ‘the United States is’ as we say today without being self-conscious at all.

~ Shelby Foote, historian

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union…”   So begins the preamble to the Constitution of the United States.   “We the People…” began with the idea of banding together in the spirit of democracy, in order to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity…”  Oh, well! Could this period in which we now live represent the beginning of the death of the democratic experiment that was and is supposed to be the United States?

charlottesville.jpgCharlottesville, 2017  – image by Andalou Agency/Getty Images

As a second follow-up to Tim Snyder’s article On Tyranny, the post this week links to a lengthy article only briefly mentioned in last week’s post.  The article is called “We need political parties. But their rabid partisanship could destroy American democracy” (which appeared in Vox on September 5th, 2017).   The article, by Lee Drutman  is quite long, but well worth working your way through as it presents a series of issues we should all consider, including:

  • Our fundamental disagreement about what it means to be an “American”
  • The value of political parties
  • Reasons for why we maintain relatively intractable political positions and staunchly maintained polarization
  • How and why division in current U.S. politics is preventing democracy from functioning as it should
  • How the current political climate in the U.S. threatens to create a breaking point akin to the Civil War
  • That inequality and polarization have grown in tandem for the last few decades
  • That the intrusion of money into the electoral process is fueling voter discontent and the disjuncture between the public (actual constituents) and campaign donors (paying constituents)’.

As mentioned, the article is lengthy, not very sexy, but well worth the effort to understand what it presents.


Extending the Drutman article’s focus on political division, next week’s post– Death of Democracy – Part 2—frames this problem into a slightly more embedded historical context, reaching toward addressing our need not only for less division but toward more proactive socio-political solidarity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make Peace Every Step

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Social justice innovator Victor Narro, arms crossed, participates in a Creative Self-Care workshop at Teada Productions in Los Angeles. (Texas Isaiah)

We are working on a post involving the topic of nonviolence and its place within tense situations such as occurred in Charlottesville.  While researching the piece, we came across an article called “Power to the Peaceful” in an August 2017 post presented by truthdig!  Take a look.  You might find the article and the embedded video inspiring.

Have you thought about adopting a non-violent stance within the context of protests or, even better (and harder), in EveryDayLife?  While many of us talk about nonviolence from a theoretical point of view how often do we exercise it?  Many might suppose the issue does not arise in the flow of day to day occurrences?  No?  That troublesome neighbor, co-worker, spouse or friend can often present a perfect opportunity to see ourselves as true, often times sacrificial, peacemakers.  Consider these six ideas from Dr. Martin Luther King.

Six pillars of nonviolent resistance

  1. Do not mistake nonviolence for passivity or cowardice.
  2. Do not seek to defeat or humiliate the opponent, but to win his friendship and understanding.
  3. Remember that those who perpetrate violence are often victims themselves.
  4. Accept suffering, if necessary, without retaliation, because unearned suffering is redemptive and can educate and transform.
  5. Meet hate with love—not the sentimental kind, but an active love, of understanding and kindness, what the Greeks called agape—that restores community.
  6. Know that the universe is on the side of justice.

Any questions?

Apologies to those expecting a follow-up to the post on Tim Snyder’ book On Tyranny.  That post is in the works, but has proven to be more complicated than expected.  (As a teaser, Mr. Snyder has predicted a coup in the U.S. within the next year).

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While researching the possibility of a coup d’etat in the U.S., we came across a site called QuoraQuora is a question and answer site where questions are “asked, answered, edited and organized by its community of users”.  We have not researched this site enough to rate it, however, a brief perusal suggests the questions to be interesting and the answers to be well thought out and thorough–sometimes.

You will have to register through a real account like Google or Facebook.  During the registration process, you can focus the article categories as a filter for your personalized topic “menu”.  Available topics like politics, health, technology, music, etc.—just as you might expect—are included.  These topics become immediately available to you when you complete the sign up process.

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The site cannot be characterized as either heavy or light.  Backing into the site, so to speak, by following a link to a particularly good article (answer to a question) initially gave the impression of depth and seriousness.  However, further exploration for only a short time began to feel pointless. The questions posted vary dramatically.  For instance, there are questions which roughly might be characterized as trivia (“Could a current medical doctor have saved Presidents Lincoln and McKinley with our current medical knowledge?”).  Some are personal (“When is the loneliest moment of your life?”).  Some are political (“Why aren’t jobs coming back to the USA?”, “Have there ever been any countries that have tried to overthrow the US Government?” and “Is a coup d’etat underway in the USA?”). The profundity of the answers are largely determined by the questions. (Incidentally, the articles on the possibility of U.S. coup d’etat are quite interesting.)

Quora will probably never be one of your go-to sites for research.  But you might find it an interesting ancillary source of information.

A Little Gratitude

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While a follow-up piece around Tim Snyder’s book On Tyranny was planned for this week, given the tragedy unfolding in the Houston area (and the general tragedy occurring in the U.S. in general), perhaps we should pause and give thanks for some instances of Good and the people who initiated them.

Jennifer-Hofmann (small)This week, on her weekly Action List, under the “Acts of Gratitude” section, Jen Hofmann posted the following entries (appearing here verbatim, but be sure to check out Jen’s list).

Acts of Gratitude
Get out your stamps, postcards, and sparkle markers for some gratitude mail.
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Us Helping Us

I am only one, but still I am one. 
I cannot do everything, but still I can do something;
I will not refuse to do the something I can do.
~ Helen Keller

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Help! We Need Help!

Who is “We”? We is you, me, all of us. In particular, part of our community living in the Houston, Texas area is in need of assistance, now and in the near future. As of Tuesday, August 29, the hurricane might make land fall again on Wednesday in Louisiana. With heavy rain and possible tornadoes expected, more folks might be in need. Reach out and help create the community many of us want to believe in. Here are some opportunities.


Make a Donation to the Red Cross

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Some have balked at the notion of donating to the Red Cross, proposing that the organization is not up to the task of large-scale disaster relief or that they do not actually need the money.   Whether such claims are true or not, folks still need our help (here-now and in the near future).  Second, we need to express, if only to ourselves, that We are the those who will offer such assistance when anyone of us needs it.

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Beyond the Red Cross

The New York Times has put together a list of other places to help.  Take a look.

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More Motivation

ABC News (with commercials) offers this encouragement as well as other opportunities to help.

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In case you missed it, you can simply
text “HARVEY” to 90999 to make a $10 donation to the Red Cross.

Make a difference for US.