The Perils of Separation

In defiance of the FCC

State Defiance - Washington net neutrality

On March 5, 2018, Washington State governor Jay Islee signed into law some bold legislation – HB2282: entitled “Protecting an open Internet in Washington State”. In direct defiance of the abolition of net neutrality by the Federal Communication Commission or FCC, Washington State became the first state in the Union to defy what some consider the corporate takeover of the Internet at the behest of the United States federal government. Other state governments are resisting the FCC by warning Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) that no state government business will be conducted with companies that do not comply with former net neutrality rules. While appeals attempting to restore net neutrality on a national level are already in place, even if such a restoration is upheld by the Senate, the House of Representatives is not likely to reverse the FCC’s December 14th, 2017 decision. Armed with the knowledge that the vast majority of Americans (including most Washingtonians) favor net neutrality and anticipating the aftermath of the FCC ruling, Washington State and an increasing number of municipalities have mobilized to counteract the federal government’s seeming willingness to defy the will of the People.
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Perspective II

finding-your-purpose

Last week, we presented the notion that our point of view—regardless of the context—is a choice or choices we have made. Furthermore, we are always free to choose, free to exercise choice, whether we believe in the existence of such freedom or not. Finally, if our current perspective suggests a specific way of viewing the world, a different choice could present a completely different way of seeing (and being in) the world.

In an essay from February 2018 called “Finding Our Bearings”, L.M. Sacasas suggests that we have a better chance of knowing where we are, a better chance to get our bearings, if we broaden rather than narrow our perspective.
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Perspective I

persepctive - ParisIf you could do anything right now, anything at all, what would you do? Why? Here is a slightly different question. If you had no constraints, if you could cause one thing to happen in the world, what event or change would you choose? Now, consider that of all the things you could have chosen, you chose this (whatever that is). What does that say about you? About your orientation and desires? Do you express such interests in your day to day decisions?

When you begin to consider what you might do if you could do anything, what is your first and second thought? Hard to pin down? For many of us one of those thoughts will be negative—some reason we believe stands in the way of doing something we say we want. We bump our heads on that learned limitation some have called achievable belief threshold or ABT—which effectively stops us in our tracks. While our wishes reflect what is important to us, so do our beliefs in limits to our freedom to fully express ourselves. But are these limits real, imposed contrivances or excuses? (more…)

More Than We Are

If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it;
Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of earth.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

aspire - ap.jpg

What is meaning? How does any definition we choose relate to EveryDayLife?

While researching our burgeoning topic “Who We Are” and the general concept of meanings in our lives, we came across this post from November of 2012. It speaks personally to the question of meaning in a way no theory can. As you read the heart felt words of a “helper”, consider the question we asked last week: Is the world better today because you are in it? (more…)

Do Some GOOD Today

Two Items from Jen Hofmann’s
Americans of Conscience Action List

 

resist_1.pngIt has been more than a year since the current person occupying the White House along with a curiously right leaning Congress began implementing changes which have altered and at times threatened the lives and wellbeing of common people.  Even those who support the person whom some call “45” have begun to realize the People are not his primary interest.

Last year, many began flying a banner with the essential sentiment “Resist!”.  When a perceived wrong is being committed by anyone—an individual, a collection of individuals or a government—resistance represents the bare minimum activity for people of conscience.  But resistance is not enough.  We who truly do seek the wellbeing of the People should be focused primarily on proactive behavior that seeks to enhance or at least maintain the rights and privileges Americans have come to expect.

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In this light, for well over a year, Jen Hofmann has been faithfully posting both opportunities for various types of action and thanks to those who have acted on behalf of others.  Although we have posted several links to Jen’s Action List in the past, we have not yet passed on anything from her list this year.  Today, we correct that.  Take a look at a couple entries from Jen’s list.  Better yet, go over to her page and choose something to do this week. (more…)

Inside-Outside II

Introduction to Part II

journey 3 - Part II

We began this journey with the Sophia Burns article on the movie, The Last Jedi.  Uncharacteristic for the Star Wars series, the general message was curiously populist—that people cannot rely on leaders or grand heroic figures to “fix things”.  We must rely on ourselves. In this second segment of Inside-Outside, we consider the driving forces within us and our collective experience as these forces impact our ability to choose.  Toward the end of the article, a simple exercise is presented—an exercise which, if employed diligently, could revolutionize our daily lives. (more…)

Inside-Outside I

…a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step…
~ Lao Tzu

journey - Title Image

Part I: Introduction

Sometimes we need to go back to basics. The proverb above is ancient (that is, “old”). The aphorism’s “classic” truth about a journey’s beginnings is not diminished by the age of the phrase. The idea is timeless. Yet to an alarming extent, our modern society eschews things “old” as unimportant, lacking worth. We do so as a component of our own demise. Perhaps we should begin to re-examine some of those “old” ideas that have provided strength and resilience in EveryDayLife.

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